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From the Editor-in-Chief of .Net Developer's Journal

Derek Ferguson

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Top Stories by Derek Ferguson

From time to time, I find myself lassoing a sacred cow in this Editorial space, dragging it over to the slaughterhouse of rhetoric, and ultimately barbecuing its falsehood over the stainless-steel, six-burner, propane-powered grill of real-world experience. To wit, the current industry obsession with SOA as a panacea for every information system ill from performance to security is, in my humble opinion, a phenomenal load of crap. Now, please don't misunderstand me. I am not saying that there isn't a myriad of benefits to be derived from exposing systems' functionality for access by other automated systems simply by passing XML across industry-standard networking protocols such as HTTP and TCP. Web services are great! If you have to interoperate with non-Microsoft systems, they may be your only option. If you are building a system today and you suspect that some other... (more)

Microsoft Set to Reveal 272 "Hidden" Windows APIs and 113 "Secret" Protocols

(August 9, 2002) - In an announcement made on August 5 by Brad Smith, Microsoft senior vice president and general counsel, the Redmond, Washington-based software company said it would release a set of 272 Application Programmer Interfaces (APIs) which are currently hidden within their Windows family of Operating Systems. These APIs are used by Windows to secretly communicate with five applications which currently come "bundled" as a part of Windows. These applications are: Internet Explorer Microsoft Messenger Outlook Express Microsoft's Java Virtual Machine Windows Media Playe... (more)

Timing the Market with Distributed Genetics - Part 2

At the end of my previous article (DNDJ, Vol. 6, issue 4), I explained the theory behind the two major technologies to be used in timing the market. On the one hand, we are dealing with distributed computing - a process whereby large computationally intensive tasks can be broken up and shared among multiple computers in order to be processed in a shorter amount of time. On the other hand, genetic programming gives us a mechanism for solving the most complicated of problems by "evolving" a solution through the random creation of multiple candidate solutions and the gradual selecti... (more)

Invoking .NET Web Services from Mobile Devices Part 1 of 2 Pocket PCs put .NET Web services at your fingertips

In May 2000 I was invited to Microsoft's corporate headquarters in Redmond for a special "technology experts" summit. At this summit, the forty or so of us in attendance were given a special sneak preview of a technology upon which Microsoft planned to "bet the farm," so to speak. They called the technology "ASP+ Web Methods." Of course, nowadays we all know these as .NET Web services. The fundamental technologies upon which they are based (XML, SOAP, SDL, UDDI, DISCO, etc.) are probably familiar to just about all of this publication's readership in one form or another. What ma... (more)

From the .NET Developer's Journal Archives: A Talk with the Father of C#

In this classic codehead-to-codehead interview with the editor-in-chief of .NET Developer's Journal, Microsoft's Anders Hejlsberg discusses the origins and the future of C#. The interview appeared in .NET Developer's Journal, Vol 1 issue 1 - in October 2002. .NETDJ: Why did you choose to work for Microsoft? AH: I started at Microsoft in 1996. I started after 13 years at Borland and had increasingly had some disagreements with management there about the direction in which the company should go. I felt that they should focus more on tools for developers. Actually, Borland is caterin... (more)