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From the Editor-in-Chief of .Net Developer's Journal

Derek Ferguson

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Top Stories by Derek Ferguson

Related Links: .NET Developer's Journal Editor-in-Chief Named Microsoft "Most Valued Professional" .NETDJ: What is your official title and department? Don Box: I am an architect in the Distributed Systems Group. I am responsible for the protocols and the plumbing that we do in that group. I'm on an architecture team, so the responsibility is distributed, but basically five other architects and I work on the WS-* protocols, Indigo, and the stuff that leads up to Indigo, such as work on ASMX and Web Services Enhancements (WSE). .NETDJ: How did you get started in computer technologies? DB: I started programming in 1983 as an undergraduate math student. After that, I went to graduate school, then started a company and had a ton of fun in the 1990s doing COM. In 2001, I decided to get a real job so I came to Microsoft. At the ripe old age of 39, I had my first HR review (whe... (more)

.NET Archives: Getting Reacquainted with the Father of C#

In our premier issue, back in October 2002, we ran a full-length interview with Anders Hejlsberg, the Distinguished Engineer at Microsoft responsible for the creation of the C# programming language. Then, in March 2005, we presented a follow-up interview conducted by .NETDJ's editor-in-chief, Derek Ferguson, at Microsoft's Tech Ed 2004 conference in San Diego, California. Here it is again in full. .NETDJ: Between now and the last time we spoke, Borland has entered the .NET space. As an ex-Borland employee who is now one of the most revered .NET icons, what are your thoughts on t... (more)

i-Technology Viewpoint: "SOA Sucks"

From time to time, I find myself lassoing a sacred cow in this Editorial space, dragging it over to the slaughterhouse of rhetoric, and ultimately barbecuing its falsehood over the stainless-steel, six-burner, propane-powered grill of real-world experience. To wit, the current industry obsession with SOA as a panacea for every information system ill from performance to security is, in my humble opinion, a phenomenal load of crap. Now, please don't misunderstand me. I am not saying that there isn't a myriad of benefits to be derived from exposing systems' functionality for access b... (more)

Parasoft's SOAtest 3.0

Recently, a client asked me to create a new .NET Web Service that would let them do sales tax calculations from any computer on their network. The product they had been using was an old-fashioned C program meant for a single computer. They used to wrap this in a COM component and access it via traditional Active Server Pages, but now they wanted to migrate to fully managed code. There were two reasons that I looked to SOAPtest to assure the quality of my newly constructed Web Service. On one hand, I had been working to inculcate a sense of quality craftsmanship in the developmen... (more)

Microsoft Set to Reveal 272 "Hidden" Windows APIs and 113 "Secret" Protocols

(August 9, 2002) - In an announcement made on August 5 by Brad Smith, Microsoft senior vice president and general counsel, the Redmond, Washington-based software company said it would release a set of 272 Application Programmer Interfaces (APIs) which are currently hidden within their Windows family of Operating Systems. These APIs are used by Windows to secretly communicate with five applications which currently come "bundled" as a part of Windows. These applications are: Internet Explorer Microsoft Messenger Outlook Express Microsoft's Java Virtual Machine Windows Media Playe... (more)